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The Divine Comedy

The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri is a wonderful allegory about human ethics.


Dante, the supreme storyteller takes us into a medieval view of Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven. Love and light will be found in Paradise but first we journey with him and the Roman writer Virgil to the nine circles of the Inferno, the nine levels of Purgatory, and the nine heavens within Paradise where Virgil leaves Dante to be with his true love Beatrice.


Far more than simply a consideration of the state of souls after death; it is an allegory about human ethics. ​To fully “take in” the wonder of this work you may wish to devote a daily set amount of time to read as much as possible out loud!


The langue spoken is Italian not Latin. Well, technically it is a Tuscan/Florentine dialect (that forms the basis of modern day Italian).

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's translation follows:




Wonderful Lectures from Yale:

About the Course [via oyc.yale.edu/]

Download all course pages





The next parts:

6. Inferno XII, XIII, XV, XVI

7. Inferno XIX, XXI, XXV, XXVI

8. Inferno XXVI, XXVII, XXVIII

9. Inferno XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII, XXXIV

10. Purgatory I, II

11. Purgatory V, VI, IX, X

12. Purgatory X, XI, XII, XVI, XVII

13. Purgatory XIX, XXI, XXII

14. Purgatory XXIV, XXV, XXVI

15. Purgatory XXX, XXXI, XXXIII

16. Paradise I, II

17. Paradise IV, VI, X

18. Paradise XI, XII

19. Paradise XV, XVI, XVII

20. Paradise XVIII, XIX, XXI, XXII

21. Paradise XXIV, XXV, XXVI

22. Paradise XXVII, XXVIII, XXIX

23. Paradise XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII

24. General Review


Further reading:

How the Divine Comedy inspired William Blake and Gustave Doré

Alternative text version: digitaldante.columbia.edu

Notes on InfernoPurgatory & Heaven

Gustave Doré’s (1832-1883) illustrations


SHOULD NOT BE VIEWED BY CHILDREN!

(THE IMAGES ARE VERY SCARY).


See also: William Blake's illustrations

EXTRA: