William Eggleston - Eye Colored by Unique Passion

" I had this notion of what I called a democratic way of looking around, that nothing was more or less important." - William Eggleston

William Eggleston (see full biography) is responsible for a radical shift in the art world. He can be credited for turning color photography into an accepted form of art!

"Nothing becomes weirdly amazing"!


In the following BBC documentary we discover the magic of Eggleston's image composition which he admits has been greatly influenced by Henri Cartier Bresson's work. Most striking is the calm, hypnotic and flowing voice of the artist: He speaks of always taking ONE picture per subject (not two or more). Related: Matters of Record - Art Forum.


He speaks of never taking things for granted, of how all space works* and counts!

And shares how "nothing becomes weirdly amazing":






More about the BBC's Imagine series: programmes episodes - guide | Alan Yentob |

Stranded in Canton

In 1973 Eggleston was influenced by his friend Andy Warhol to use the new Sony PortaPak video camera and he went off documenting the soul of Memphis and New Orleans:

More: EgglestonTrust.com and The year video art was born

EXTRA

* The Red Ceiling is one of the best-known works by William Eggleston. It is also known as "Greenwood, Mississippi, 1973" after the location and year it was taken. See full frame view

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